Aboriginal Art Exhibitions

Landscape Colours

Gallery 1

8 Feb – 24 March 2019

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Pintupi Artists of the Western Desert

Gallery 2

8 Feb – 24 March 2019

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Tangentyere Artists

July 8, 2011 - August 17, 2011

Tangentyere Artists represent paintings and stories from Indigenous artists of the Alice Springs Town Camps. The art centre provides art support and marketing to over 380 artists from 19 Alice Springs Town Camps. These camps are home to around 2,000 Indigenous people from the local area as well as many visitors from the remote communities of Central Australia. The Town Camp artists represent 20 different central Australian languages, and the stories they present in their paintings are a diverse and rewarding experience. This exhibition is presented in association with Tangentyere Artists.

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Yinjaa-Barni – Pilbara Artworks

May 20, 2011 - June 29, 2011

Yinjaa-Barni Artists continue to refine and re-define the nature of their art and the images of their homelands. Located in coastal Roebourne in Western Australia’s Pilbara district, the country here spreads beyond the Fortescue River in an otherwise arid region of breakaway hills.

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Julalikari Artists

May 20, 2011 - June 29, 2011

Tennant Creek artists Peggy Jones, Flora Holt, Lindy Brody and Susan Nelson make whimsical observations of their world in and around Tennant Creek along the Stuart Highway between Alice Springs and Darwin. In these paintings are images of country – bush medicine and bush tucker, birds and animals, soakages and ceremonies. Then there are images of the mission church, biblical stories, and images of modernity – family events with Toyotas and station wagons, road trains and the railway line. The artists are represented by Julalikari Arts Centre, operating as a regional hub for the Barkly region, a huge expanse of nearly 300,000 square km between the tropical Top End and the arid Red Centre in the Northern Territory.

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Tjapaltjarri Brothers

April 8, 2011 - May 11, 2011

Their ‘first contact’ story is extraordinary. A group of nine Pintupi people who had lived a traditional lifestyle near Lake Mackay in the Gibson Desert, dramatically made contact in 1984 with their relatives near Kiwirrkurra. The community quickly realised that the group were relatives who had been left behind in the desert twenty years earlier. The family group were four brothers, three sisters and two mothers. The boys were in their teens – one subsequently returned to the desert, and three have gone on to become well known artists – Warlimpirrnga, Walala, and Thomas Tjapaltjarri. This is their story.

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Aurukun Artists

April 8, 2011 - May 11, 2011

Aurukun artists from the north-west coast of Cape York Peninsula have developed a distinctive style of sculpture and painting. The works have emerged from items which were used solely for ritual ceremony, to become expressions of life and art as experienced by the clans of coastal northern Queensland. This exhibition of paintings features the work of four women artists – Akay Koo’oila, Janet Koongotema, Rebecca Wolmby and Jean Walmbeng. The exhibition is presented in association with Wik and Kugu Art Centre.

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Jack Dale Mengenen

February 18, 2011 - March 30, 2011

Senior Ngarinyin man Jack Dale Mengenen stands as a walking history of the great upheavals that shook the Kimberley during the twentieth century. Born sometime around 1920, Jack Dale has seen the frontier violence, the move to station life and the threat to traditional culture, all of which have marked Aboriginal lives during this time.

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Katherine Marshall Nakamarra Exhibition 2011

February 18, 2011 - March 30, 2011

Katherine Marshall Nakamarra, the daughter of highly-acclaimed Pintupi artist Walangkura Napanangka, has been painting since 1986. Her father, Johnny Yungut Tjupurrula, was also a painter, as were her mother’s sister, Pirrmangka Napanangka, and her grandmother, Inyuwa Nampitjinpa. Similarities can be seen between Katherine’s work and the bold style of other Papunya Tula artists, particularly that of her mother. This is especially evident in the way the paint is applied in thick, joined dots.

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