Papunya Aboriginal Art

A selection of paintings showing the styles from this Aboriginal art region - some paintings may still be available for sale, while some may have been sold.

 

Water Dreaming by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Water Dreaming

Jap 004696  |  acrylic on linen  |  100 x 100 cm

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Tingari by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Tingari

Jap 011714  |  acrylic on linen  |  96 x 61 cm

Tingari – Karrkurritinytja by George Ward Tjungurrayi

George Ward Tjungurrayi  |  Tingari – Karrkurritinytja

Jap 011863  |  acrylic on linen  |  150 x 90 cm

Water Dreaming by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Water Dreaming

Jap 011711  |  acrylic on linen  |  96 x 61 cm

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Water Dreaming by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Water Dreaming

Jap 011708  |  acrylic on linen  |  96 x 60 cm

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Snake and Water Dreaming by Long Jack Phillipus

Long Jack Phillipus  |  Snake and Water Dreaming

Jap 000661  |  acrylic on canvas  |  142 x 98 cm

Bushfire Dreaming by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Bushfire Dreaming

Jap 014408  |  acrylic on linen  |  90 x 59 cm

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Tingari by George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi

George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi  |  Tingari

Jap 018382  |  acrylic on linen  |  122 x 91 cm

Tingari Cycle by George Ward Tjungurrayi

George Ward Tjungurrayi  |  Tingari Cycle

Jap 003712  |  acrylic on canvas  |  122 x 121 cm

Tingari by George Ward Tjungurrayi

George Ward Tjungurrayi  |  Tingari

Jap 010053  |  acrylic on linen  |  204 x 136 cm

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Bushfire Dreaming by Maxie Tjampitjinpa

Maxie Tjampitjinpa  |  Bushfire Dreaming

Jap 012542  |  acrylic on linen  |  183 x 121 cm

Bushfire Dreaming by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Bushfire Dreaming

Jap 014410  |  acrylic on linen  |  90 x 59 cm

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Tingari – Fire Dreaming by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Tingari – Fire Dreaming

Jap 006532  |  acrylic on linen  |  121 x 61 cm

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Water & Lightning Rain Dreaming by Long Jack Phillipus

Long Jack Phillipus  |  Water & Lightning Rain Dreaming

Jap 000664  |  acrylic on canvas  |  117 x 61 cm

Untitled by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Untitled

Jap 010502  |  acrylic on linen  |  121 x 121 cm

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Goanna Muliera at Arrapilongu by Paddy Carroll Tjungurrayi

Paddy Carroll Tjungurrayi  |  Goanna Muliera at Arrapilongu

Jap 000838  |  acrylic on linen  |  100x 65 cm

Untitled by Pinta Pinta Tjapanangka

Pinta Pinta Tjapanangka  |  Untitled

Jap 010501  |  acrylic on linen  |  107 x 29 cm

Water Dreaming by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Water Dreaming

Jap 010531  |  acrylic on linen  |  183 x 30 cm

Snake Dreaming by Long Jack Phillipus

Long Jack Phillipus  |  Snake Dreaming

Jap 000663  |  acrylic on canvas  |  116 x 60 cm

Tingari by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Tingari

Jap 010532  |  acrylic on linen  |  183 x 30 cm

Tingari – Fire Dreaming by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Tingari – Fire Dreaming

Jap 015464  |  acrylic on linen  |  150 x 90 cm

Sold

Water Dreaming by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Water Dreaming

Jap 011726  |  acrylic on linen  |  300 x 190 cm

Sold

Tingari by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa  |  Tingari

Jap 011724  |  acrylic on linen  |  190 x 190 cm

Sold

Papunya community in the Central Desert is 240km north-west of Alice Springs, and it is here that the Desert Painting movement began in 1971. Aboriginal people from across the Central and Western Deserts were settled in Papunya as part of Australia’s assimilation policy, an attempt to merge one of the world’s oldest living cultures into mainstream Australian society. Papunya settlement was established as an administrative centre for the Aboriginal groups who moved from their traditional lands to the west.

Aboriginal people in 1971 they had only recently won their citizen rights, after a hundred years of western occupation of their desert lands. This era was a difficult time of social upheaval and turmoil, and Aboriginal people needed a means of defining themselves to the seemingly hostile society surrounding them. The Papunya Tula Aboriginal art movement began in 1971 when a school teacher, Geoffrey Bardon, encouraged some of the men to paint a blank school wall. The murals sparked off tremendous interest in the community and soon many men started painting, with the original group of Aboriginal artists successfully establishing their own company in 1972.

Since that time many Pintupi and Luritja people have moved back to their homelands, to the communities of Kintore and Kiwirrkura, and continue their strong ceremonial ties to the land. The Papunya painting style derives directly from the Aboriginal artists’ knowledge of the traditional body and sand painting associated with ceremony. To portray these Tjukurrpa creation stories for public viewing has required the judicious removal of sacred symbols by the artists and the careful monitoring of ancestral designs.

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