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George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi

George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi

George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi, Pintupi artist b.1947, original Papunya artist, paints Tingari patterns relating to the Land and Law.

George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi

George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi arrived at Papunya in 1962 after walking in from the Gibson Desert in Western Australia. When the Desert Art painting movement began at Papunya in 1971 George assisted other senior artists with their paintings.

Then he began painting his own works around 1976 with the encouragement of senior lawman Nosepeg Tjupurrula. The artwork created by George Tjungurrayi in the 1970’s and 1980’s was typical of the imagery used by major Pintupi artists like Anatjari Tjamptjinpa and Yala Yala Gibbs.

By the mid 1980s George Tjungurrayi began a more experimental phase in his art, embracing colours beyond the earth based palette. His subject matter remained the ceremonies and stories bound up with the journeys of the Ancestors told through the Tingari cycle of sacred songs. These narratives related to sacred sites including his own birth place Wala Wala, and other locations around Kiwirrkura and Lake Mackay across to Kilpinya to the north of Kintore.

Paintings from the 1980s by senior Papunya artists including George’s brother Willy Tjungurrayi and fellow artists Turkey Tolson Tjupurrula, Ronnie Tjampitjinpa and Mick Namarari open up a new phase of the Desert art movement.

The artworks begin to move away from the traditional narrative conventions embraced by the original founding artists. Now the paintings have a different energy and power emanating from the source of the Tingari law without referring to specific moments. The designs are recognisable from the fluted carvings made of fine parallel lines and interlocking motifs that decorate men’s ceremonial items and sacred objects.

George Tjungurrayi continued to build his artistic reputation with solo exhibitions in the late 1990s and representation in the Wynne Prize and in major public and private collections. He remains one of the great names of the early Papunya movement still creating major works today.

George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi arrived at Papunya in 1962 after walking in from the Gibson Desert in Western Australia. When the Desert Art painting movement began at Papunya in 1971 George assisted other senior artists with their paintings.

Then he began painting his own works around 1976 with the encouragement of senior lawman Nosepeg Tjupurrula. The artwork created by George Tjungurrayi in the 1970’s and 1980’s was typical of the imagery used by major Pintupi artists like Anatjari Tjamptjinpa and Yala Yala Gibbs.

By the mid 1980s George Tjungurrayi began a more experimental phase in his art, embracing colours beyond the earth based palette. His subject matter remained the ceremonies and stories bound up with the journeys of the Ancestors told through the Tingari cycle of sacred songs. These narratives related to sacred sites including his own birth place Wala Wala, and other locations around Kiwirrkura and Lake Mackay across to Kilpinya to the north of Kintore.

Paintings from the 1980s by senior Papunya artists including George’s brother Willy Tjungurrayi and fellow artists Turkey Tolson Tjupurrula, Ronnie Tjampitjinpa and Mick Namarari open up a new phase of the Desert art movement.

The artworks begin to move away from the traditional narrative conventions embraced by the original founding artists. Now the paintings have a different energy and power emanating from the source of the Tingari law without referring to specific moments. The designs are recognisable from the fluted carvings made of fine parallel lines and interlocking motifs that decorate men’s ceremonial items and sacred objects.

George Tjungurrayi continued to build his artistic reputation with solo exhibitions in the late 1990s and representation in the Wynne Prize and in major public and private collections. He remains one of the great names of the early Papunya movement still creating major works today.

Solo Exhibitions

Group Exhibitions

Collections

National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne VIC
Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide SA
Museum of Victoria, Melbourne VIC
Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane QLD
Queensland University Art Museum. Brisbane QLD
Artbank, Sydney NSW
Supreme Court of Northern Territory, Darwin NT
Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand
Holmes à Court Collection, Perth WA
Kelton Foundation, Los Angeles USA
University of Virginia USA
Musee des Arts d’Afrique et d’Oceanien, Paris, France
Groninger Museum, The Netherlands

Awards

2016 Wynne Prize AGNSW (Finalist)
2015 Wynne Prize AGNSW (Finalist)
2014 Wynne Prize AGNSW (Finalist)
2010 27th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award Darwin (highly commended)
2007 Wynne Prize AGNSW (Finalist)
2004 Wynne Prize AGNSW (Finalist)

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Country by George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi

George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi  |  Country

Jap 004747  |  acrylic on linen  |  200 x 140 cm

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Tingari by George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi

George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi  |  Tingari

Jap 013195  |  acrylic on canvas  |  126 x 94 cm

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Tingari by George Hairbrush Tjungurrayi

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Jap 012644  |  acrylic on linen  |  151 x 105 cm

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